Possible Interactions with: Zinc
   

Possible Interactions with: Zinc

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use zinc without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Blood Pressure Medications, ACE Inhibitors
A class of medications called ACE Inhibitors, such as captopril and enalpril, used for high blood pressure may deplete zinc stores.

Antibiotics
Zinc may decrease the absorption of oral quinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin, as well as tetracycline antibiotics (including tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline).

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
HRT, consisting of estrogen and progesterone derivatives may reduce loss of zinc in the urine, particularly in women with osteoporosis.

Hydralazine
There has been at least one report of an interaction between zinc and hydralazine, a medication used to treat high blood pressure, which resulted in a lupus-erythematosus-like syndrome (characterized by a facial butterfly rash, fever, leg and mouth ulcers, and abdominal distress).

Immunosuppressant Medications
Since zinc supports immune function, it should not be taken with corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or other medications intended to suppress the immune system.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Zinc interacts with NSAIDs and could reduce the absorption and effectiveness of these medications. Examples of NSAIDs, which help to reduce pain and inflammation, include ibuprofen, naprosyn, piroxicam, and indomethacin.

Penicillamine
This medication, used to treat Wilson's disease (excessive amounts of copper that accumulate in the brain, liver, kidney, and eyes) and rheumatoid arthritis, decreases zinc levels.


Drug Interactions
ACE Inhibitors
Antibiotics
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
Hydralazine
Immunosuppressive Medications
Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Copyright © 2004 A.D.A.M., Inc

The publisher does not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of the information or the consequences arising from the application, use, or misuse of any of the information contained herein, including any injury and/or damage to any person or property as a matter of product liability, negligence, or otherwise. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made in regard to the contents of this material. No claims or endorsements are made for any drugs or compounds currently marketed or in investigative use. This material is not intended as a guide to self-medication. The reader is advised to discuss the information provided here with a doctor, pharmacist, nurse, or other authorized healthcare practitioner and to check product information (including package inserts) regarding dosage, precautions, warnings, interactions, and contraindications before administering any drug, herb, or supplement discussed herein.

 
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