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Table of Contents > Supplements > Melatonin > Interactions
Possible Interactions with: Melatonin

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use melatonin without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Antidepressant Medications
In an animal study, melatonin supplements reduced the antidepressant effects of desipramine and fluoxetine. More research is needed to determine whether these effects would occur in people. In addition, fluoxetine (a member of a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or SSRIs) has led to measurable depletion of melatonin in people.

Antipsychotic Medications
A common side effect of antipsychotic medications used to treat schizophrenia is a condition called tardive dyskinesia, a movement disorder of the mouth characterized by a constant chewing motion and darting action of the tongue. In a study of 22 people with schizophrenia and tardive dyskinesia caused by antipsychotic medications, those who took melatonin supplements had significantly reduced mouth movements compared to those who did not take the supplements.

Benzodiazepines
The combination of melatonin and triazolam (a benzodiazepine medication used for the treatment of anxiety and sleep disorders) improved sleep quality in one study. In addition, there have been a few reports suggesting that melatonin supplements may help individuals stop using long-term benzodiazepine therapy. (Benzodiazepines are highly addictive.)

Blood Pressure Medications
Melatonin may reduce the effectiveness of blood pressure medications like methoxamine and clonidine. In addition, medications in a class called calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem, amlodipine, nimodipine, felodipine, nisoldipine, and bepridil) may decrease melatonin levels.

Use of beta-blockers (another class of high blood pressure medications including propranolol, acebutolol, atenolol, labetolol, metoprolol, pindolol, nadolol, sotalol, and timolol) may reduce melatonin production in the body.

Blood-thinning Medications, Anticoagulants
Melatonin may increase the risk of bleeding from anticoagulant medications such as warfarin.

Interleukin-2
In one study of 80 cancer patients, use of melatonin in conjunction with interleukin-2 led to more tumor regression and better survival rates than treatment with interleukin-2 alone.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may reduce the levels of melatonin in the blood.

Steroids and Immunosuppressant Medications
Melatonin should not be taken with corticosteroids or other medications used to suppress the immune system because the supplement may cause them to be ineffective.

Tamoxifen
Preliminary research suggests that the combination of tamoxifen (a chemotherapy drug) and melatonin may benefit certain patients with breast and other cancers. More research is needed to confirm these results.

Other Substances
Caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol can all diminish levels of melatonin in the body while cocaine and amphetamines may increase melatonin production.


Drug Interactions
Antidepressant Medications
Antipsychotic Medications
Benzodiazepines
Blood Pressure Medications
Blood-thinning Medications, Anticoagulants
Clonidine-containing Medications
Immunosuppressive Medications
Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Tamoxifen

Copyright © 2004 A.D.A.M., Inc

The publisher does not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of the information or the consequences arising from the application, use, or misuse of any of the information contained herein, including any injury and/or damage to any person or property as a matter of product liability, negligence, or otherwise. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made in regard to the contents of this material. No claims or endorsements are made for any drugs or compounds currently marketed or in investigative use. This material is not intended as a guide to self-medication. The reader is advised to discuss the information provided here with a doctor, pharmacist, nurse, or other authorized healthcare practitioner and to check product information (including package inserts) regarding dosage, precautions, warnings, interactions, and contraindications before administering any drug, herb, or supplement discussed herein.

 
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Melatonin
  Uses of this Supplement
Anorexia Nervosa
Atherosclerosis
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Breast Cancer
Depression
Encephalitis, Viral
Erythema
Insomnia
Menopause
Osteoporosis
Prostate Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sarcoidosis
Seizure Disorders
  Supplements with Similar Uses
View List by Use
  Drugs that Interact
Summary
Antidepressant Medications
Antipsychotic Medications
Benzodiazepines
Blood Pressure Medications
Blood-thinning Medications, Anticoagulants
Clonidine-containing Medications
Immunosuppressive Medications
Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
Tamoxifen
  Drugs that Deplete this Substance
View List
  Supplements with Similar Side Effects
View List by Side Effect
  Supplements with Similar Warnings
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