Triamcinolone
   

Triamcinolone
Pronunciation
Brand Names
Foreign Brand Names
Therapeutic Categories
What key warnings should I know about before taking this medicine?
Reasons not to take this medicine
What is this medicine used for?
How does it work?
How is it best taken?
What do I do if I miss a dose?
What are the precautions when taking this medicine?
What are the common side effects of this medicine?
What should I monitor?
Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately
How should I store this medicine?
General statements

Pronunciation
(trye am SIN oh lone)

Brand Names
Amcort®; Aristocort®; Aristocort® A; Aristocort® Forte; Aristocort® Intralesional; Aristospan® Intra-Articular; Aristospan® Intralesional; Atolone®; Azmacort™; Delta-Tritex®; Flutex®; Kenacort®; Kenaject-40®; Kenalog®; Kenalog-10®; Kenalog-40®; Kenalog® H; Kenalog® in Orabase®; Kenonel®; Nasacort®; Nasacort® AQ; Tac™-3; Tac™-40; Triacet™; Triam-A®; Triam Forte®; Triderm®; Tri-Kort®; Trilog®; Trilone®; Tri-Nasal®; Tristoject®

Foreign Brand Names
Kenacort® (Mexico); Ledercort (Mexico); Zamacort (Mexico)

Therapeutic Categories
Corticosteroid, Adrenal; Corticosteroid, Oral Inhaler; Corticosteroid, Nasal; Corticosteroid, Parenteral; Corticosteroid, Topical

What key warnings should I know about before taking this medicine?

  • When switching from an oral steroid to an inhaled one there can be problems. Symptoms such as weakness, feeling tired, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, inability to think clearly, or low blood sugar may occur. Call healthcare provider right away if any of these symptoms occur. If you have a serious accident and are injured, have surgery, or any type of infection you may need extra doses of oral steroids. These extra steroids will help your body deal with these stresses. Carry a warning card saying that you may need extra steroids at certain times.


Reasons not to take this medicine

  • If you have an allergy to triamcinolone or any other part of the medicine.
  • If you have a serious infection in your body.
  • This medicine will not help if you have a severe asthma attack.


What is this medicine used for?

  • Oral inhalation:
    • This medicine is used for the treatment of chronic asthma to prevent attacks. It is not helpful during an asthma attack. The biggest benefit may be seen after 2 weeks of the medicine.
  • Oral:
    • It is also used for the treatment of poor adrenal function, rheumatic disorders, allergies, lung disease, systemic lupus, erythematosus, and other diseases requiring anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive effects.
  • Nasal:
    • This medicine is used to treat the nasal symptoms in patients with allergies. It is not helpful during an allergy attack. The biggest benefit may be seen after 1-2 weeks of regular use.
  • Skin application:
    • This medicine is used to treat a variety of skin conditions: contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, eczema, lichen planus, bug bites, burns, psoriasis, severe diaper rash, chronic discoid lupus erythematosus, alopecia areata, mycosis fungoides, dermatophyte and fungus (yeast) infections. There may be other skin conditions not listed here.


How does it work?

  • Oral inhalation:
    • Triamcinolone prevents or reduces irritation in the airways of the lungs and may relax the muscles of the airways to prevent lung spasms.
  • Oral:
    • Triamcinolone acts as an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant agent.
  • Nasal:
    • Triamcinolone prevents or reduces irritation and swelling in the nose.
  • Skin application:
    • Triamcinolone reduces irritation and itching on the affected areas of the skin.


How is it best taken?

  • Oral inhalation:
    • Check inhaler use with healthcare provider at each visit. Using the inhaler the right way is very important.
    • There are two types of inhalers: Aerosol and powder with delivery device. For aerosol, shake well first. If you cannot work the inhaler, ask healthcare provider for a device called a spacer to help. Children younger than 8 should use spacer.
    • Do not suddenly stop using this medicine if you have been taking it at a high dose for a long time. Medicine should be slowly decreased.
  • Oral:
    • Take with food. Take in the morning if you are taking this medicine once a day.
    • A liquid (concentrate, syrup) is available if you cannot swallow pills. Those who have feeding tubes can also use the liquid. Flush the feeding tube before and after medicine is given.
    • Do not suddenly stop using this medicine if you have been taking it for a long time. Medicine should be slowly decreased.
  • Nasal:
    • For the nose only. Take at a similar time every day. Shake well first.
    • Blow your nose before using.
    • Check spray use with healthcare provider at each visit.
    • Do not suddenly stop using this medicine if you have been taking it at a high dose for a long time. Medicine should be slowly decreased.
  • Skin application:
    • Do not take by mouth. For skin only. Keep out of mouth, nose, and eyes (may burn).
    • Wash your hands before and after use.
    • Use ointment or cream in a small amount over the area affected as a light film. Rub in gently.
    • Do not put coverings (bandages, dressings, make-up) over the area unless told to do so by healthcare provider.
    • Do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants on a child treated in the diaper area. This may cause more medicine to get into the child's system.


What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as possible.
  • If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed one. Return to your regular schedule.
  • Do not take a double dose or extra doses.


What are the precautions when taking this medicine?

  • Wear disease medical alert identification if you have asthma, lung disease, or are an allergy sufferer or if you are going to be on this medicine longer than 3-4 weeks.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are allergic to any medicine. Make sure to tell about the allergy and how it affected you. This includes telling about rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, throat; or any other symptoms involved.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding.


What are the common side effects of this medicine?

  • Oral inhalation:
    • Headache. Mild pain medicine may help.
    • Sore throat, stuffy, runny nose, hoarseness.
    • Mouth infection. To prevent, rinse with water after each use.
  • Nasal:
    • Headache. Mild pain medicine may help.
    • Nasal irritation, burning, and dryness.
  • Skin application:
    • Burning, swelling, or redness of the skin.


What should I monitor?

  • If a child is using this medicine, monitor growth carefully.
  • Follow up with healthcare provider.


Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately

  • Signs of a life-threatening reaction. These include wheezing; tightness in the chest; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; fits; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Any signs or symptoms of infection. This may include a fever greater than 99 degrees, chills, sore throat, cough, increased sputum or change in color, painful urination, mouth sores, wound that will not heal, anal itching or pain.
  • Feeling weak, tired, irritable, trembling; having rapid heartbeats, confusion, sweating, dizziness, especially if you missed a dose or recently stopped this medicine.
  • No improvement in condition or feeling worse.
  • Skin application:
    • Severe burning, swelling, or redness of skin.
    • Any new rash.


How should I store this medicine?

  • Oral inhalation:
    • Store aerosol and powder at room temperature in a dry place.
    • Protect aerosol from freezing and direct sunlight.
    • Use powder within 2 months after opening foil package.
  • Oral:
    • Store at room temperature.
  • Nasal:
    • Store spray at room temperature.
  • Skin application:
    • Store at room temperature.


General statements

  • Do not share your medicine with others and do not take anyone else's medicine.
  • Keep all medicine out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Keep a list of all your medicines (prescription, herbal/supplements, vitamins, over-the-counter) with you. Give this list to healthcare provider (doctor, nurse, pharmacist, physician assistant).
  • Talk with healthcare provider before starting any new medicine, including over-the-counter or natural products (herbs, vitamins).


Copyright © 1978-2001 Lexi-Comp Inc. All Rights Reserved

 
... Brought to you by