Apraclonidine
   

Apraclonidine
Pronunciation
Brand Names
Therapeutic Categories
Reasons not to take this medicine
What is this medicine used for?
How does it work?
How is it best taken?
What do I do if I miss a dose?
What are the precautions when taking this medicine?
What are the common side effects of this medicine?
What should I monitor?
Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately
How should I store this medicine?
General statements

Pronunciation
(a pra KLOE ni deen)

Brand Names
Iopidine®

Therapeutic Categories
Alpha2 Agonist, Ophthalmic

Reasons not to take this medicine

  • If you have an allergy to clonidine, apraclonidine, or any other part of the medicine.


What is this medicine used for?

  • This medicine is used for the treatment of postsurgical intraocular pressure elevation.
  • Short-term medicine addition to patients who still have increased intraocular pressure.


How does it work?

  • Apraclonidine decreases intraocular pressure in patients with elevated or normal pressures. The patient may not have glaucoma. Some surgical procedures may increase the pressure in the eye. This medicine brings the pressure down.


How is it best taken?

  • For the eye only.
  • Take out soft contact lenses before using medicine. Lenses can be replaced 15 minutes after medicine is given.
  • Do not touch the bottle or tube tip to the eye, lid, or other skin.
  • Tilt head back and drop medicine into eye.
  • After using medicine keep your eyes closed. Apply pressure to the inside corner of the eye. Do this for 3-5 minutes. This keeps medicine in the eye.
  • Separate each eye medicine by 5 minutes. Give one and wait 5 minutes before using the next.


What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as possible.
  • If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed one. Return to your regular schedule.
  • Do not take a double dose or extra doses.


What are the precautions when taking this medicine?

  • Avoid alcohol (includes wine, beer, and liquor) and other medicines and herbs that slow your actions and reactions. This includes sedatives, tranquilizers, mood stabilizers, or pain medicine. Talk with healthcare provider.
  • Do not use these medicines with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. These include isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine. Separate use by 2 weeks.
  • This medicine should be used for less than 1 month.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are allergic to any medicine. Make sure to tell about the allergy and how it affected you. This includes telling about rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, throat; or any other symptoms involved.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding.


What are the common side effects of this medicine?

  • Redness, itching, tearing, discomfort, and lid swelling.
  • Blurred vision, dry eye, feeling as if something is in the eye.
  • Dry mouth. Frequent mouth care, sucking hard candy, or chewing gum may help.
  • Feeling tired or lightheaded. Avoid driving, doing other tasks or activities that require you to be alert until you see how this medicine affects you.


What should I monitor?

  • Check eye pressures regularly. Talk with healthcare provider.
  • Follow up with healthcare provider.


Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately

  • Signs of a life-threatening reaction. These include wheezing; tightness in the chest; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; fits; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Any rash.


How should I store this medicine?

  • Store in a tight, light-resistant container at room temperature.


General statements

  • Do not share your medicine with others and do not take anyone else's medicine.
  • Keep all medicine out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Keep a list of all your medicines (prescription, herbal/supplements, vitamins, over-the-counter) with you. Give this list to healthcare provider (doctor, nurse, pharmacist, physician assistant).
  • Talk with healthcare provider before starting any new medicine, including over-the-counter or natural products (herbs, vitamins).


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