Amiloride
   

Amiloride
Pronunciation
Brand Names
Therapeutic Categories
Reasons not to take this medicine
What is this medicine used for?
How does it work?
How is it best taken?
What do I do if I miss a dose?
What are the precautions when taking this medicine?
What are the common side effects of this medicine?
What should I monitor?
Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately
How should I store this medicine?
General statements

Pronunciation
(a MIL oh ride)

Brand Names
Midamor®

Therapeutic Categories
Diuretic, Potassium Sparing

Reasons not to take this medicine

  • If you have an allergy to amiloride or any other part of the medicine.
  • If you have any of the following conditions: High potassium levels in the blood, severe kidney disease, kidney disease caused by diabetes.
  • If you have kidney disease or diabetes you need to be watched closely.
  • If you are taking other potassium-conserving agents (eg, spironolactone, triamterene) or potassium supplementation (medicine, potassium-containing salt substitutes, potassium-rich diet).


What is this medicine used for?

  • This medicine is used to get rid of extra fluid, salt, and water slowly and gently.
  • It is frequently used in a liver disease called cirrhosis.
  • It can also be used to increase potassium stores in the body.


How does it work?

  • Amiloride can get rid of extra salt and water in the body. It competes against a hormone made in the body called aldosterone. In the same way, amiloride increases potassium stores in the body.


How is it best taken?

  • Take with or without food. Take with food if this medicine causes an upset stomach.
  • Follow diet plan (low sodium) as recommended by healthcare provider.
  • Tablet may be crushed and mixed with food or liquid.


What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as possible.
  • If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed one. Return to your regular schedule.
  • Do not take a double dose or extra doses.


What are the precautions when taking this medicine?

  • Check medicines with healthcare provider. Make sure other medicines you are taking do not increase potassium.
  • Avoid alcohol (includes wine, beer, and liquor). Can increase weight gain.
  • Not for use in kidney disease. Talk with healthcare provider.
  • Do not use over-the-counter products that increase blood pressure. These include cough or cold remedies, diet pills, stimulants, ibuprofen or like products, and certain herbs or supplements. Talk with healthcare provider.
  • Avoid potassium-containing salt substitutes and potassium supplements. Talk with healthcare provider.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are allergic to any medicine. Make sure to tell about the allergy and how it affected you. This includes telling about rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, throat; or any other symptoms involved.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant.
  • Tell healthcare provider if you are breast-feeding.


What are the common side effects of this medicine?

  • Feeling lightheaded. Avoid driving, doing other tasks or activities that require you to be alert until you see how this medicine affects you.
  • Dizziness is common. Rise slowly over several minutes from sitting or lying position. Be careful climbing stairs.
  • Females: Breast tenderness, deepening of voice, increased hair growth, menstrual changes.
  • Males: Breast enlargement.
  • Nausea or vomiting. Small frequent meals, frequent mouth care, sucking hard candy, or chewing gum may help.
  • High potassium. This may make you feel weak, lightheaded, dizzy, or have numbness and tingling.
  • Change in sexual ability or desire. This can return to normal after medicine is stopped. Talk with healthcare provider about other medicines without this side effect.


What should I monitor?

  • If you are using this medicine for fluid removal, check daily weight. Report a weight gain or no weight loss.
  • Check blood pressure regularly.
  • Follow diet plan (low salt) and exercise program as recommended by healthcare provider.
  • Check blood work. Talk with healthcare provider.


Reasons to call healthcare provider immediately

  • Signs of a life-threatening reaction. These include wheezing; tightness in the chest; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; fits; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Passing out, fainting, dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, numbness, and tingling.
  • Severe nausea, vomiting, and/or diarrhea.
  • Menstrual changes. This includes lots of bleeding, spotting, or bleeding between cycles.
  • Any rash.


How should I store this medicine?

  • Store in a tight container at room temperature. Protect from moisture, freezing, and excessive heat.


General statements

  • Do not share your medicine with others and do not take anyone else's medicine.
  • Keep all medicine out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Keep a list of all your medicines (prescription, herbal/supplements, vitamins, over-the-counter) with you. Give this list to healthcare provider (doctor, nurse, pharmacist, physician assistant).
  • Talk with healthcare provider before starting any new medicine, including over-the-counter or natural products (herbs, vitamins).


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